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20121201
20121201
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
in my lifetime with respect to broad openings in china. a, diplomatic openings. the ones who want to recognize china will abide by the one china policy. the economic doors that have taken china to a relatively small economy to the second largest in the world. and 3, primacy of the party with its 80 million members and 3000 outposts in the world. now you have xi jinping rising to power. he has been given the party mantle and soon the military and the presidency. before him will be new questions much different from the ones that deng xiaoping was responsible for acting upon. before xi jinping will be questions like, is china more repressive at home today than in earlier years. is china more nationalistic in its economic practices, but jiggly those among the enterprises? has china become more assertive internationally? i would argue east of these questions carried fairly profound rule of law implications. as xi jinping rises to take the top position in china and wrestles with new challenges and attempts to answer any questions, i would argue that many of them are based in basic rule
in china is starting to develop a taste for french wine. investors are seeing new opportunities in the big wine regions, and not unexpectedly, it is a development which is not popular with some of the french. >> it seems everything she turns her hand to is a success. she is one of china's biggest celebrities -- singer, model, actress -- and now honor of a prestigious french vineyard. it was in french hands for four centuries before the chinese came. in china, red wine has become the latest new thing, and increasing numbers of chinese are heading to france to invest in their very own vineyard. >> i tried several other lines before, but when i came here, everything was just right -- the building, the surroundings, everything. i fell in love with the place straightaway, and the wine. >> time for a toast with the previous owner, who is obviously pleased with the sale. the purchase price is undisclosed. chinese buyers often pay much more than the norm. even if they do not understand each other, everyone understands the language of money. business is conducted through an interpreter. >> people i
likely comes from the defense sector. at a time when china is rising. you see those planes land on that aircraft carrier this week? the middle east is boiling. i don't know. did we really want that big defense budget cut? i mean, maybe nothing more than the decline in spending is the war in afghanistan winds down. saving about half a trillion dollars over the time. maybe more. the areas where the defense job losses take place they look mighty red to me, at least on the electoral map. yes, you'll have to say goodbye to the fabulous 15% dividend rates and the capital gains rates will rise, not as much. the wealthy will pay what they had to pay percentage-wise during the best period for the stock market in my lifetime, the clinton years. i don't want to pay more tax. you don't, either. if we won't necessarily live happily ever after because of that i think we may be able to take -- i might be able to take this pin off before new year's day. wouldn't that be something? get this pin off before new year's day? that's why i need you to watch "meet the press" on sunday. not just because
out of the way. it's laissez-faire capitalism. but china is a communist country but it's also a capital country, just a different definition of capitalism, and singapore, where there's a strong collaboration between the government and the market, you have a different form of capitalism. places like brazil and india where there's a big social agenda, you have a different form. anyone europe, southern europe, northern europe, different forms, but in northern europe, the informed capitalism, where the government believes in strong social safety net, believes in paying for health care, believes in playing a role in determining what businesses grow or fail, and they're creating more jobs than we are. so we have to be careful when we, as we sometimes do in the united states, get up on our high horse and say we understand capitalism. actually what's going on in the world is a competition between different versions, and if our version produces more inequality, produces less growth, it's -- is seen as less fair and others are seep as more fair and producing growth, who do you think is
and where is china all of this? >> so there are several different pieces. one of them going back to the economy, we used to have much higher practices than we do now. how were we able to have full employment on that? we did not have the system of the budget deficits what makes it so much harder and just to sort of duty had enough, it is the persistence of trade deficit least not have one and now we do and that is a big drag on the economy. which hasn't been better actually the trade deficit is actually significantly down but not all. we have had some that have become more competitive that is the front on which we need to work. the political debate hasn't kept up with the reality it's no longer the quarter of that anymore. it's the broadest of countries some that need to be worked on and the next president isn't just china bashing but what do we need to do have a world that is everybody trying to run a trade surplus which the government believes it is possible. [laughter] >> then there is this issue of trade and income inequality. and there's a similar level that presumably had re
as china with the issue of human rights. as long as the international community does not address the interests of the importance stakeholders, that is not really going to help. what is your take on that? >> i think they have very short form policy. i have been in moscow and we met with the russian minister of foreign affairs. syria and russia have a relationship. we need to keep such a relationship, but with such short policies by defending the assad regime, you of making such a relationship very difficult. i think the syrians see russia the same as they see the assad regime. when you see your brother and sister being killed every day -- i have been in syria and i have lots of examples. when the syrian people solve all of this happen for them, of course, they will change their position on russia. i think for russia to keep their ambassador, it is difficult to keep him in damascus. any government in the future, they will put their relationship with russia and iran as a priority. there are many voices within the opposition, and the syrian government should be open to negotiations a
around the world, china is a huge creditor. we owe them over a trillion, we'll japan over a trillion. governments are holding on to this debt. you know, there is a story. i forget where it was run that mentioned from the peak of the housing double until now they said the average american household net worth was down about 40%. it's actually down a lot more than that when you factor in each share of the debt that has been accumulated in their name by the federal government. so americans are basically already broke. that's why we have to just admit that we are insolvent because the american families cannot repay the money that's been borrowed in their name. so we admit that we are insolvent. greece imposed a hair cut at 50% of the bondholders. we tell people that have one-year treasury bills we can't pay you back in a year. you have to extend the maturity beebee ten years. america has to tell people who are collecting social security right now or who are expecting to collect it they aren't going to get as much money as they were promised. we have to cut the pensions of the retired amid
. they're probably going to succeed. some people are saying that china is also reinflating and they had a soft landing. then what about europe? i've seen some people touting europe. if you look at the financial fear indicators in europe, that crisis is basically over. >> well, yes, it is. i don't know if you can capture in the frame on the camera. what i'm doing here, i'm patting myself on the back. who is it who's been telling your viewers for two years every time there's one of these trumped-up crises in europe to buy it. now there's been a solution. europe has been stabilized. it's actually the brightest place for investors on the planet. i'm sorry you missed the bottom but it's not too late. you look at after hearing that segment on the u.s. government making the decision to debase paper coins by turning them into -- paper money by turning them into junk disposable paper coins? well what would you rather own? the ten-year american bond, treasury bond yielding what, 1.6%? or would you rather have a spanish bond denominated in the strongest currency in the world, the euro, paying 5.5%
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)